New recipes

Banoffee Pie

Banoffee Pie

Bananas, toffee, whipped cream, and chocolate get all mixed up into a decadent banoffee pie.MORE+LESS-

Make with

Pillsbury Pie Crust

2

can (14 oz) sweetened condensed milk

1

Pillsbury™ Refrigerated Pie Crust

1 1/2

cups heavy whipping cream

1

tablespoon granulated sugar

Shaved chocolate, for topping (optional)

Hide Images

  • 1

    Preheat oven to 425°F. Pour both cans sweetened condensed milk into a pie plate. Cover plate tightly with foil. Place pie plate in center of a rimmed oven-safe pan or baking sheet. Pour boiling water into pan, enough to reach halfway up the sides of the pie plate. Bake until milk is thick and golden brown and becomes toffee, about 2 hours, adding more boiling water to the pan every half-hour to keep it at the halfway mark.

  • 2

    Remove pie plate from pan and pour toffee into a bowl. Place bowl in refrigerator and cool 1 hour.

  • 3

    Meanwhile, bake the crust: Heat oven to 450°F. Press pie crust evenly into the bottom and sides of an ungreased pie plate; poke bottom and sides with a fork. Bake crust until golden brown and set, about 10-12 minutes. Remove from oven; cool completely on cooling rack.

  • 4

    Pour chilled toffee into bottom of fully cooled pie crust; use a spatula to spread evenly. Place pie in fridge and chill 1 hour.

  • 5

    Remove pie from fridge. Slice bananas and sprinkle on top of toffee. In a large bowl or bowl of a stand mixer, whisk together heavy cream and sugar until stiff peaks form, about 5 minutes.

  • 6

    Spoon whipped cream over pie. Top pie with shaved chocolate, if desired.

No nutrition information available for this recipe

More About This Recipe

  • Just when I think I can’t possibly love pie any more, along comes this thing called Banoffee Pie (a.k.a. banana toffee pie) and I’m a GONER.There’s no saving me from my pie love – except for when there’s no more pie.Luckily, this pie is ridiculously easy to make, so when I inevitably finish off this banoffee pie, I can whip up another one all easy-peasy like. Oh, boy – this could get dangerous.Let’s talk about pie!When you pour the sweetened condensed milk into a pie plate, make sure you use a pie plate that can withstand high temperatures for long periods of time, a.k.a. don’t use a glass pie plate. Otherwise bad things may happen in the oven, a.k.a. explosions.Bake up this pie for any holiday festivities you’ve got coming up that requires a delicious dessert. Oh and then invite me over, mmmmk?

Banoffee Pie

Banoffee pie is a traditional British dessert that is prepared with bananas, cream and toffee, combined with a short pastry or a base made from crumbled biscuits and butter.

Its name, which was originally spelled “banoffi”, is a portmanteau combining the words “banana” and “toffee”, just like the Uruguayan choripan (chorizo and pan) or the Costa Rican chifrijo (chicharrones and frijoles).

What is the origin of the banoffee pie?

The banoffee pie was created in 1971 by Nigel Mackenzie, the owner of The Hungry Monk Restaurant in Jevington, East Sussex, and his chef, Ian Dowding.

The original recipe was based on an American dessert recipe called “Blum’s Coffee Toffee Pie” from the Blum’s Bakery in San Francisco.

Related Posts:

The American cake did not include any fruits, but Mackenzie and Dowding decided to improve the recipe by testing apple and mandarin orange. However, the ultimate combination that seemed to work perfectly included banana.

Their recipe had a shortcrust pastry base. However, the recipe has evolved since, and is now mostly prepared with a crust composed of crumbled biscuits and butter, much to the regret of their inventors. However, the biscuit base has become popular for a reason. Unlike the original shortcrust base, it doesn’t get soggy at the bottom after just a few hours, and therefore keeps fresh longer.

Another pet peeve of his inventors is the use of aerosol cream when the original recipe calls for lightly coffee-flavored whipped cream.

Mackenzie came up with the name “banoffi pie” as a temporary name, but the name stuck. The dessert was so popular that although it was supposed to be offered for a limited time, it was never taken off the menu.

The success of the banoffee pie

The recipe started to appear in the Oxford English Dictionary in 1997 as “A pie or tart made with toffee, bananas, and cream” but the banoffee is so popular that the word even made it to the English language to describe any food that tastes or smells both banana and toffee.

A few years after its creation, it was rumored to be served to the Prime Minister and at Buckingham Palace.

The banoffee pie recipe often appears as one of the recipes printed on cans of Nestlé’s sweetened condensed milk.

The recipe was eventually published in The Deeper Secrets of the Hungry Monk in 1974, and later reprinted in the 1997 cookbook In Heaven with The Hungry Monk.

What is the origin of the Blum’s coffee toffee pie?

Blum’s coffee toffee pie is the pie that inspired Mackenzie and Dowding to create the banoffee pie. This pie was served at the long-closed Blum’s bakery and restaurants, in San Francisco.

The bakery was also home to the legendary coffee crunch cake. The cake was composed of light sponge cake layers that were smothered in coffee-flavored whipped cream, and garnished with broken hard candy.

The combination of smooth and crunchy textures, along with the contrast of the light lemon and vanilla flavor with the bittersweet coffee whipped cream, made it a sensational success.

From the 1940s through the 1960s, people came to the flagship bakery on Union Square to taste sandwiches, fountain drinks, handmade candies as well as popular desserts such as the coffee toffee pie and the coffee crunch cake.

The coffee crunch cake was actually created by accident. Indeed, the cake that was originally spelled Koffee Krunch Kake (maybe not the best acronym), was invented by master baker Ernest Weil in the 1940s.

As one of the employees overcooked what was supposed to be soft coffee candy, Weil smashed the hard substance and broke it into pieces. He eventually reused the pieces to decorate a sponge cake with whipped cream frosting. The cake was such a huge hit that it became a staple of Blum’s bakery and restaurants.

Along with the sticky toffee pudding, this banoffee pie, which was also created in the second half of the 20th century, has become a classic British dessert, just as popular as the older and more traditional trifle.

I had the opportunity to try banoffee pie at restaurants around the world, including a few in England and Ireland, and I am never disappointed. This was the first time I made it at home… and it was such a hit that I made it a second time, perfecting the recipe a little more by adjusting for a thicker texture of the toffee.

This no-bake banoffee pie recipe is very easy to make and will surely be a success with your gourmand friends and family.


Banoffee Pie

In a large bowl, whisk the flour with the confectioners&rsquo sugar and salt. Using a pastry blender or 2 knives, cut in 1 stick plus 2 tablespoons of the butter until the mixture resembles coarse meal with some pea-size pieces of butter remaining. Stir in the cold water and egg yolk until the dough just comes together. Scrape the dough out onto a work surface and pat into a disk. Wrap the dough in plastic and refrigerate for 1 hour.

Preheat the oven to 350°. On a lightly floured work surface, roll out the dough to a 12-inch round, a scant 1/4 inch thick. Ease the dough into a 9-inch pie plate. Trim the overhang to 1 inch and fold it under itself. Crimp the edge and freeze until firm, about 15 minutes.

Line the crust with parchment paper and fill with pie weights or dried beans. Bake for about 20 minutes, until the crust is barely set. Remove the parchment and pie weights and bake for 20 to 25 minutes longer, until the crust is lightly browned prick the bottom of the crust lightly to deflate it if it puffs up. Let cool.

In a medium saucepan, combine the remaining 1 stick of butter with the brown sugar and cook over moderate heat until the sugar is melted, about 5 minutes. Remove from the heat. Stir in the dulce de leche until smooth. Let the filling cool.

Meanwhile, in a microwave-safe medium bowl, microwave the chopped chocolate on high power in 10-second intervals until melted. Spread the chocolate over the cooled crust and freeze until firm, about 10 minutes.

Spread the dulce de leche filling in the crust and top with the sliced bananas. In a large bowl, using a hand mixer, beat the cream until firm. Pile the whipped cream on the pie and refrigerate for at least 3 hours, until the filling is set. Cut into wedges and serve.


Instructions

Chilling time: a minimum of 2¼ hours. Cook time: 5 minutes.

1. Line the sides of the tin with strips of cling film (using a little water to help the cling film stick) and then line the base with a disc of baking paper.

2. First make the pie base. Place the biscuits in a freezer bag and finely crush with a rolling pin. Melt the butter in a non-stick saucepan over a low heat, add the biscuits and combine. Spoon into the base of the tin, pressing down with the back of the spoon to level. Chill for 15 minutes.

3. To make the filling, heat the butter and sugar in the same pan and stir over a low heat until combined. Add the condensed milk and bring to the boil and boil, stirring continuously, for 2–3 minutes or until dark golden, taking care that the mixture doesn’t catch on the bottom. Do not allow to boil for too long or it will become grainy. Add the vanilla extract and pour into the tin. Chill in the fridge for a minimum of 1 hour or up to 24 hours.

4. Peel and slice the bananas and arrange in neat rounds on top of the caramel. Whip the cream to soft peaks and spoon or pipe it over the bananas, then level the top before chilling in the fridge for an hour.

5. Meanwhile, melt the chocolate in a bowl set over pan of gently simmering water. Remove from the heat and allow to cool.

6. Remove the edges of the tin from the banoffee pie, peel off the cling film and transfer to a serving plate, slipping the baking paper from underneath. Zigzag the melted chocolate over the top (if using), making sure it’s cool or it will melt the cream, or dust with cocoa powder.

The base and filling can be made up to a day ahead and kept in the fridge. Ideally, the pie should be assembled with the banana and cream on the day. However, it can be assembled a day in advance: as long as the banana is completely covered in the cream, it will not discolour.

* For a speedier dessert, use a tin of ready-made caramel (bear in mind this doesn’t set as firmly).


Banana Recipes

Who can resist the heavenly combination of banana and toffee in one delectable pie? Not us, that’s for sure.

Ingredients

  • 23 cm diameter spring form cake tin
  • 1 x 250 gm packet of Granita or Marie Biscuits
  • 125 gm butter, melted
  • 1 x 495 gm tin sweetened condensed milk
  • 50 gm or 2 ½ tablespoons of butter, cubed
  • 3 tablespoons or 60 gm golden syrup
  • 4-5 firm bananas
  • 400 ml cream, whipped
  • 50 gm chocolate, grated

Method

Crush the biscuits in a food processor until you have fine crumbs then and add the melted butter. Process again to combine. The crumbs should stick together when squeezed.

Press into the spring form cake tin halfway up the sides. Refrigerate while you make the filling.

Place the cubed butter and the golden syrup into a saucepan and heat, stirring until melted.

Add the tin of condensed milk and stir on medium heat for approximately 5-8 minutes until the mixture bubbles, thickens and starts to change colour.

Remove from the heat and cool for a couple of minutes before pouring into the chilled crumb crust.

Refrigerate until cold and firm. The pie can be made up to this point and finished when you are ready.

Slice three bananas and mix them with the whipped cream.

Pour into the tart shell on top of the chilled caramel and smooth down to a nice flat surface.

Sprinkle chocolate shavings onto the top of the tart and then decorate with the final sliced banana.

Notes

If making ahead of time, toss the bananas in a small amount of lemon juice.