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New McDonald’s After Midnight Menu Offers Breakfast and Lunch

New McDonald’s After Midnight Menu Offers Breakfast and Lunch

The late-night menu is being tested in select markets

McDonald's offers After Midnight menu

A late-night breakfast at McDonald’s may soon be available across the nation. According to the Chicago Tribune, the chain restaurant has introduced After Midnight, a test menu that offers value items from the breakfast and regular menus.

The menu is limited to selection of products from the breakfast and lunch menu, according to Burger Business. From 12 A.M. to 4 A.M., customers can order lunch items, such as fries, Chicken McNuggets, and Big Mac, with breakfast items such as hash browns, hot cakes, and Egg White Delight. McCafe drinks and desserts are also available.

The new menu is now available in Delaware, Bryan and College Station, Texas, Rockford, Illinois, and in northern Indiana. McDonald’s would be the first fast-food chain to introduce a late-night breakfast and lunch menu if they decided to launch it nationwide.

A challenge to provide this menu involves creating an effective way to simultaneously serve breakfast and lunch items, J.M Owens, the president of the Greater Atlanta McDonald’s Operators Association, told Burger Business. The lack of space on the grills limits the available menu options.

Despite this challenge, the After Midnight menu is a step forward in expanding menu options for late-night consumers.


McDonald’s

This blog is primarily for those of you who stay at the All Star Resorts. The McDonald’s located on Buena Vista Drive was built specifically to cater to these three hotels.

As you might recall, this McDonald’s once had enormous caricatures of a hamburger, fries, and a shake on its roof. For whatever reason, the powers-that-be decided it was time for a change and both the exterior and interior of this restaurant received a major makeover. Here are a couple of pictures of the new exterior. Gone are the fanciful figures to be replaced by sleek, modern lines.

The outdoor seating area has been given a casual feel complete with some comfortable wicker chairs and palm trees.

The ordering station and beverage bar received only minor changes.

The seating area is more festive than its predecessor. This is accomplished by using white tables and chairs of primary colors. In addition, the overhead panels now display sporting scenes, also in colors that coordinate with the chairs.

Two “group” seating areas are clustered together under light colored wood canopies. Four flat-screen TVs can also be found within this setting.

The inside ordering counter and dining room are open daily from 5am to 1am. The drive-thru is open 24 hours.

Note, this McDonald’s is extremely busy for breakfast and dinner. At lunchtime, it’s practically deserted.

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Beef

A meal include your choice of fries or a garden salad plus a soft drink.

Menu Item Price Small Meal Medium Meal Large Meal
Big Mac $6.40 $10.25 $10.95 $11.65
Double Big Mac $8.60 $12.45 $13.15 $13.90
McFeast $6.70 $10.45 $11.15 $11.85
Quarter Pounder $6.40 $10.25 $10.95 $11.65
Double Beef ‘n’ Bacon $5.45 $8.75 $9.45 $10.15
Cheeseburger $3.50 $6.40 $7.10 $7.80
Double Quarter Pounder $7.65 $11.00 $11.70 $12.40
Hamburger $2.50 $5.00 $5.65 $6.30
Double Cheeseburger $5.00 $8.40 $9.10 $9.80
Triple Cheeseburger $6.45 $10.00 $10.70 $11.40
Classic Beef McWrap $8.00 $11.90 $12.60 $13.30
Hamburger $1.50 (promo)
Grass Fed Beef Burger $9.45 $12.40 $13.10 $13.80
BBQ Baoon Angus $8.80 $11.75 $12.45 $13.15
Classic Angus $8.00 $10.90 $11.60 $12.30
Angus Clubhouse $8.70 $11.65 $12.35 $13.05


All Day Fun with McDonald’s All Day Breakfast

This past weekend we had a rare and quiet weekend, with no birthday parties to shuffle the kids to, no tickets to local events, no plans with friends – just two whole days of nothing. Doesn’t that sound kind of glorious? We slept in, then hung around in pajamas until lunch time. It was a beautiful day out, so my husband suggested we go out for lunch. The only problem? Our laid back morning meant we had skipped breakfast as well, and now some of us were really craving breakfast food. After such a great morning I didn’t want to waste an ounce of family time on a disagreement, so I quickly mentioned that McDonald’s now offers breakfast all day long. That took absolutely no convincing and we were on our way in record time!

My favorite thing about McDonald’s is how well the options suit everyone in our family. It’s hard getting six people to all agree on one thing, but when we head to McDonald’s I know there will be something for everyone on the menu. It allows me to focus on what’s really important: having fun with these kids, and watching them make memories together!

So the kids grab their Happy Meals, but I am seriously craving some hashbrowns and a Sausage Egg McMuffin® so I take full advantage of the All Day Breakfast and top off my meal with a sausage burrito and orange juice (in my defence, this was technically breakfast and lunch!). Honestly, I don’t think there is a wrong time of day for hashbrowns and a Sausage Egg McMuffin® , especially when you know that those perfectly round, iconic McDonald’s eggs are made fresh in the restaurant with USDA Grade A eggs and nothing else (if you’ve ever wondered how they get them to be perfectly round, it’s by cracking them into an egg ring!). And all muffins, biscuits and bagels are prepared with real butter (not margarine!) so I know I’m starting my day off with good, healthy food.

I also love that McDonald’s is pledging to use only cage free eggs by 2025 in the US and Canada. It’s a reminder that McDonald’s menu is always changing in response to the feedback from customers. That’s important to me because I’m always trying to strike that balance between convenient and responsible, and McDonald’s gives me an opportunity to do just that.

I love that this fountain soda cup says share an ice cold coke with your fam, because that’s basically what this day was all about! My guys are having so much fun playing with their Happy Meal toys and snacking on fries while my husband and I enjoy our breakfast (my husband was totally in on this game – they’re playing Minion Hot Potato)! And look at these faces! Those are happy McDonald’s smiles for sure!

If you’re craving your own delicious breakfast check out McDonald’s menu online, or download the app to see what delicious breakfast options are available all day long! What are your favorite McDonald’s breakfast items? Do you prefer different items depending on the time of day?


The new prices will be as follows:

  • Cheeseburgers: 50p from 99p
  • Happy Meals: £1.30 from £2.99
  • A Big Mac Meal: £2.30 from £4.59
  • Breakfast meal: £1.75 from £3.99
  • Single Sausage and Egg McMuffin: £1.10 from £2.49
  • Big Mac/McChicken Sandwich/Six McNuggets: £1.60 from £3.39
  • 20 McNuggets: £3 from £5.99
  • McFlurry: 50p from 99p
  • Bacon Double Cheeseburger: £1 from £1.99
  • Cheeseburger: 50p from £1.99.
  • Big Mac: £1.69 from £3.19
  • Bacon Cheese Burger: £0.99 from £1.99
  • Bacon Mayo Chicken: £0.69 from £1.39
  • Double Cheese Burger: £0.79 from £1.59
  • Quarter Pounder: £1.69 from £3.19
  • Vegetable Deluxe: £1.69 from £3.09
  • Filet-O-Fish: £1.69 from £3.09
  • Cheese Burger: 49p from 99p
  • McChicken Sandwich: £1.69 from £3.19
  • Hamburger: 44p from 89p
  • Mayo Chicken: 49p from 99p
  • 20 Chicken Nuggets: £2.39 from £4.59
  • 9 Chicken Nuggets: £1.89 from £3.39
  • 5 Chicken Selects: £2.39 from £4.59
  • Veggie Dippers: £1.69 from £3.29
  • 3 Chicken Selects: £1.84 from £3.59
  • 6 Chicken Nuggets: £1.69 from £3.19
  • Large Fries: 74p from £1.49
  • Medium Fries: 59p from £1.19
  • Small Fries: 49p from 99p
  • Mini McFlurry: 39p from 79p
  • McFlurry: 49p from 99p.

McDonald's new prices: The new prices will be available from August 3 to 31 (Image: GETTY)


If You Want to Stick With a Salad

Courtesy of McDonald's

"It's no surprise that a Registered Dietitian Nutritionist might order a side salad with grilled chicken from McDonald's, but the dish is a good source of protein and iron, which will help you feel fuller, longer. Topping the greens with Low-Fat Balsamic Vinaigrette or Family Recipe Italian Dressing makes for a delicious meal that comes in between 290 and 460 calories." — Libby Mills, MS, RDN, LDN, Spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics

"I'd skip the soft drinks and opt for Dasani water, and then I'd have the Southwest Salad with grilled—not crispy—chicken. I like that the beans and corn in the salad offer up some fiber. To lighten it up a bit, I'd have them hold the cheese and tortilla strips and use only half of the dressing. Then, I might have a Vanilla Reduced-Fat Kids cone, just enough to tame the craving for something sweet!" — Amy Shapiro MS, RD, CDN, founder of Real Nutrition NYC

"The Premium Bacon Ranch Grilled Chicken Salad is a good source of fiber, which can boost satiety and aid digestion. Add a bit of vinaigrette dressing for some flavor and wash it down with some water." — Lauren Minchen MPH, RDN, CDN, a Registered Dietitian and Nutritionist based in New York City


McDonald's is launching a new breakfast roll in the UK this week

McDonald's is expanding its popular breakfast menu this week - with a new bacon, sausage, egg and cheese roll landing in the UK on Wednesday.

On October 21, the all-new Breakfast Roll will launch in restaurants after a successful trial in Ireland.

It comes as the chain's famous breakfast wrap remains off the menu, after being temporarily discontinued over lockdown.

The new roll contains back bacon, a sausage patty, cheese and a free-range egg.

The roll will be priced at £2.79 - and will be served daily from 5am until 11am.

The new breakfast roll will be priced at £2.79 (Image: McDonald's)

It follows the launch of three new burgers - including a new spicy quarter pounder - earlier this month.

On 7 October, McDonald's launched three new quarter pounder varieties, alongside new cheesy nacho wedges and a salted caramel latte.

The spicy burger is described as "a mouth-watering 100% beef quarter pounder patty, with two slices of pepper jack cheese, onions, jalapenos, mustard and a spicy ketchup in a sesame seed bun".

And the deluxe? Well, as well as beef, it contains "shredded lettuce, a slice of tomato, slice of cheese, pickles, fresh onions, cool mayo, ketchup, mustard, and streaky bacon all in a round sesame topped bun".

A new McChicken BLT has also launched as part of the limited edition menu that will run until November 17.

All the new items launching at McDonald's this month

New chicken options, nacho cheese wedges and salted caramel lattes have arrived (Image: McDonalds)


Chains Weigh Down Civic Center Dining Scene / Few new options for quality meal before curtain time

Restaurants are opening all over the city these days, except for the Civic Center.

In the past couple of years, Sunny Jim's has transformed into a piano store, Vivande has become another black hole in Opera Plaza, Eliza's on Oak Street moved to Pacific Heights, Evita was reopened as Paul K and Spuntino will soon be a California Pizza Kitchen.

Only two new restaurants have opened: Chevy's, the popular Mexican chain and Citizen Cake, a bakery and cafe that offers breakfast, lunch and a light before-theater tea until about 7 p.m.

As both Chevy's and the soon-to-open California Pizza Kitchen illustrate, the area is becoming crowded with chains: Lyon's, McDonald's, Burger King, Taco Bell -- and who knows what else will turn up.

While the area is great for cultural activities, it's obviously a tough spot for dining. Restaurants are packed before an event, and there's a mass exodus around curtain times. It's hard to staff, and hard to turn tables and a profit.

We went back to the restaurants and cafes ringing the Civic Center, nearly 40 in all, and what follows are the best of what we found. The prices listed are for main courses at dinner. A few restaurants are taking vacations this week, but all will be open by the time the first curtain rises.

ABSINTHE

Like its banned namesake liqueur, Absinthe offers a buzz of excitement, whether before or after a performance even on dark nights the crowd is bright and alert.

It looks like a Paris brasserie, with deep-red walls and a mural along one. For the best food, stick with the classics: onion soup, steak with gratin potatoes, duck confit and skate with polenta. The fries are unbeatable. They come in a paper cone with ketchup, malt vinegar, aioli or Dijon mustard.

Absinthe also has an excellent selection of oysters, along with shrimp, crab and caviar. In addition, there's an extensive bar menu, and you can order food until 1 a.m. on most nights.

398 Hayes St. (at Gough Street) (415) 551-1590. Breakfast and lunch Tuesday-Friday, brunch Saturday and Sunday, and dinner Tuesday-Sunday. Reservations and credit cards accepted. Prices: $17-$22.

ANANDA FUARA

For vegetarians on a budget, this quirky restaurant is a good option. It's run by students of peace teacher and poet Sri Chinmoy. His photograph adorns the sky-blue walls, his video plays in the dining room and his books are available. The workers have a dazed, slow-moving quality, but eventually the food makes it to the tables.

Herb-flecked hummus is better than the thin, lifeless chapati that accompanies it. The house-made veggie burger with flecks of carrot and zucchini tastes great but is too soft for the toasted whole-wheat bun to contain it.

Desserts, however, make the restaurant worth a visit, especially the vegan chocolate cake, which is a revelation.

1298 Market St. (at Larkin Street) (415) 621-1994. Breakfast and dinner Thursday-Tuesday breakfast and lunch on Wednesday. No alcohol or reservations. Cash only. Prices: $5.25- $9.25.

BISTRO CLOVIS

This charming corner bistro and wine bar has been a favorite of theatergoers for 13 years. Sanded wood floors, an antique bar and lots of windows letting in the last of the day's sunlight create a quaint, romantic atmosphere.

The menu consists of capable French food such as escargots in garlicky brown butter, and a blue cheese-and-endive terrine. For entrees, don't miss the hearty cassoulet, which arrives bubbling in its own covered crock. Braised short ribs with olives and creamy sweetbreads accompanied by egg fettuccine are also winners. For dessert, order the tarte tatin if you have an additional 20 minutes. If not, dig into creme brulee or vanilla ice cream-filled profiteroles covered in chocolate sauce.

Another draw is the nightly "palette" of wines: a flight of three wines such as white Burgundy, served in glasses held in place by a unique wooden palette.

1596 Market St. (at Franklin Street) (415) 864-0231. Lunch weekdays, dinner daily. Reservations and credit cards accepted. Prices: $9.50-$18.

CAFE ALLEGRO

There may be no more convenient place to eat around the Opera than Cafe Allegro -- it's located on the bottom floor of the Performing Arts Parking Garage. But don't expect anything fancy this cafe is a glorified cafeteria.

Diners can choose made-to-order sandwiches such as a decent Rueben or a California club with turkey, bacon and avocado. Other options include ready-made quiche and pastas that the staff heats up. For dessert, select one of the cookies or pastries, or opt for a scoop of Double Rainbow ice cream.

340 Grove St.(between Franklin and Gough streets) (415) 431-2200. 8 a.m.-8 p.m. daily. No alcohol or reservations. Cash and checks only. Prices: $3.95-$4.95.

CAFFE DELLE STELLE

It's not the best Italian food in the city, but it's close to where you want to go, and the prices are low.

For the most part, skip the main courses both the dry chicken and the skewers of lamb on our return visit were served with limp, sodden roasted potatoes. But pastas are a good bet. Try the pappardelle with sausage and red wine sauce or farfalle with smoked salmon, capers and a brandy sauce.

For starters the Caesar is refreshing. For a more substantial option, try the cabbage wrapped around smoked mozzarella with a porcini sauce it's generous enough for two. When you add the bread with the accompanying dipping sauce, you'll have plenty to eat.

395 Hayes St. (at Gough Street) (415) 252-1110. Lunch Monday-Saturday, dinner daily. Reservations and credit cards accepted. Prices: $8-$13.50

CANTO DO BRAZIL

After buying theater or opera tickets, your wallet might need a break. Canto do Brazil offers reasonably priced Brazilian food in a warm, colorful space.

The 18-month-old restaurant, decorated in tropical shades of blue, serves entrees such as moist, tender, beer-marinated chicken, and shrimp in a coconut-cream sauce. All come with rice, pinto beans and a small mound of faroufa, a yuca flour, to be mixed in with the dishes. It makes for hearty fare, most priced around $10.

Starters include mild codfish croquettes or beef croquettes, which combine ground beef with cracked wheat. Crispy chicken wings with a lemon-garlic sauce are delicious too. Save room for creamy coconut flan for dessert.

41 Franklin St. (between Oak and Page streets) (415) 626-8727. Lunch Monday-Saturday, dinner daily. Reservations and credit cards accepted. Prices: $9.95-$10.95.

CAREME ROOM

A new corporate owner and some remodeling that's still under way haven't changed the dining experience much in the Careme Room, the more formal restaurant of the California Culinary Academy. Diners still sample foods made by chef-students.

Keep in mind that the chefs are in training, so glitches and inconsistencies are the norm. But the price is right: three courses for $22-$32.50, depending on the night. Unfortunately, the service can be dismal. The curriculum used to include four weeks of table service classes now students practice waiting tables only one week out of the 18-month program.

625 Polk St. (at Turk Street) (415) 292-8229. Lunch and dinner Monday-Friday. Reservations and credit cards accepted. Prices: $22 prix fixe Monday-Wednesday, $32.50 prix fixe Thursday, $35.95 per person buffet Friday.

CARTA

Few restaurants have a menu as ambitious as Carta's. Every month the cuisine changes. This month, for example, it was Mediterranean. During other months it might be Moroccan, Spanish or Indian.

Specialties include small plates, mostly less than $10, and usually four or five larger plates.

The restaurant, owned by Rob Zaborny, was handsomely remodeled about a year ago. The original area is now a bar, and the space next door has become a spacious dining room with interesting art and large windows overlooking Market Street.

1760 Market St. (between Octavia and Gough streets) (415) 863-3516. Lunch weekdays, dinner daily, brunch Sunday. Reservations and credit cards accepted. Prices: $18-$27 small plates $6-$11.

CHEVY'S

The warehouse interior, punctuated with vibrant colors, makes it a festive spot for families.

590 Van Ness Ave. (at Golden Gate Avenue) (415) 621-8200. Lunch through dinner daily. Reservations for parties of eight or more. Credit cards accepted. Prices: $6.99-$13.99.

CITIZEN CAKE

Elizabeth Falkner, one of the city's most celebrated pastry chefs, closed her charming bakery in the Mission to open in a grander space at Grove and Gough. While you can get an array of pastries, cakes, ice cream and cookies, there are also 40 seats for brunch, lunch and afternoon tea/supper until 7 p.m.

The high-tech decor, with panoramic windows, is both dramatic and charming, although function has taken a backseat to design. Most chairs and benches are uncommonly uncomfortable. Fortunately, the cafe is designed for a fairly rapid in-and-out.

The before-theater tea consists of salads, soups, canapes and a few lighter dishes such as seared scallops with fennel, radish and arugula or halibut with truffled mushrooms. The cafe also features three fixed- price menus ($15-$23), all including tea and scones.

399 Grove St. (at Gough Street) (415) 861-2228. 7 a.m.-7 p.m. weekdays, 9 a.m.-7 p.m. Saturday and Sunday. No reservations. Credit cards accepted. Prices: $5.50-$8 (small plates only).

HAYES AND VINE

A remodel brightened up this already hip wine bar, filled with young adults meeting for drinks and snacks. One wall is sponged a berry color, making it a stylish counterpoint to the gleaming blond wood floor and plush purple banquettes.

The wine bar only serves nibbles, but they're of the upscale variety: cheese plates, charcuterie platters and caviar. Pair them with one of the 600 wines offered by the bottle or one of the glasses or flights.

377 Hayes St. (near Gough Street) (415) 626-5301. Open until midnight Monday-Thursday, until 1 a.m. Friday-Saturday and until 10 p.m. Sunday. Reservations for eight or more. Credit cards accepted. Prices: $3.75-$38 for caviar.

HAYES STREET GRILL

With the look of a classic grill -- light walls, dark wood, pendant lights on chains and vanity pictures of famous customers on the wall -- it has a solid, no-nonsense atmosphere.

The core of the menu is built around a half dozen or so kinds of fresh fish that can be mixed and matched with about as many sauces.

Over the years the more complicated main courses have grown to nine and include poussin with Asian flavors, petrale sole with chanterelles and house-made fennel sausage with arugula. The restaurant still boasts some of the best french fries in the city, and the creme brulee is legendary.

Service is so attuned to curtain time that we finished three courses in less than an hour.

320 Hayes St. (near Franklin Street) (415) 863-5545. Lunch weekdays, dinner daily. Reservations, credit cards accepted. Prices: $15.50- $25.

INDIGO

After three years, this blue-toned restaurant has become a favorite for opera- and balletgoers. The staff is friendly and well-trained at getting people in and out when time constraints are an issue.

The menu features an eclectic mix of California-style food. While some combinations don't quite come together -- such as a bland risotto with clunky pieces of summer squash and a dry bread pudding -- there's still a lot to recommend.

For starters, try the fig and watercress salad or pan-roasted mussels with harissa aioli. Entrees include a delicious artichoke-wrapped sea bass and a New York steak with white bean cassoulet. For dessert, dig into rhurbarb-oatmeal crisp or chocolate decadence.

687 McAllister St. (at Gough Street) (415) 673-9353. Dinner Tuesday-Sunday. Reservations, credit cards accepted. Prices: $14.95- $18.95.

JARDINIERE

For a special-occasion dinner around the Civic Center, no place can beat Jardiniere, the Pat Kuleto and Traci Des Jardins collaboration. Prices are high -- $35 for a rack and roulade of lamb with gnocchi, fennel and tomato confit -- but the execution is exceptional.

Service is super-smooth. There's a three-course before-theater dinner that will get you in and out in plenty of time, and the interior is festive. The cutout glass in the door is shaped like a martini glass, the posts between the metal railings double as glowing ice buckets and the dome of the two-story ceiling evokes the image of Champagne bubbles. What better way to toast great food and anticipate a great performance?

300 Grove St. (at Franklin Street) (415) 861-5555. Dinner daily. Reservations and credit cards accepted. Prices: $23-$35.

KITES

Since Eliza's moved its Civic Center location to California Street, Kites is the only Chinese-Asian restaurant worth a visit in the area. Formerly called La Jiao, it's decorated with butterfly kites suspended from the ceiling, which make the otherwise simple space a notch above generic.

The menu features Chinese and Thai dishes. Much of it is mediocre, but nothing we tried on a recent visit was bad. Minced chicken tasted one-dimensionally salty, but the accompanying iceberg lettuce cups were crisp and fresh. Dry pork spareribs were less successful, though they were exceptionally tender.

The family recipe for ped yang -- roasted duck with a spicy orange sauce atop peppery watercress -- makes a better entree than the Mongolian beef, with dry, stringy strips of flank steak.

536 Golden Gate Ave. (between Van Ness Avenue and Polk Street) (415) 771-1997. Lunch weekdays dinner Monday-Saturday. Reservations and credit cards accepted. Prices: $7.95-$26 for a whole tea- smoked duck.

MAX'S OPERA CAFE

San Francisco isn't known for delis, but for deli fare, Max's isn't a bad choice. Sandwiches are piled high -- pastrami and corned beef are particularly good, as is Max's version of a Reuben. Desserts are great too, especially the multilayer chocolate cake and the dense cheesecake.

But other items on the lengthy menu can fall short, such as the sloppily presented Cobb salad and the ice-cold scoops of chopped chicken liver served with big chunks of warm sauteed onions.

Service needs attention. On a recent visit, we waited 20 minutes before anyone came to the table. Then we were greeted with serious attitude. Guess that's why a sign on the door says critics aren't welcome.

601 Van Ness Ave. (in Opera Plaza) (415) 771-7300. Lunch and dinner daily. No reservations. Credit cards accepted. Prices: $8.95-$24.95.

MILLENNIUM

Eric Tucker has made this vegetarian restaurant a destination it's one of the few places to get really creative foods. The dishes go way beyond the typical grilled vegetables and tofu dishes, but most of the recipes still comply with the McDougall and Ornish diets.

The innovative appetizers include a warm spinach salad with smoked tofu in a balsamic vinaigrette and a grilled portobello mushroom with red onion marmalade, tofu aioli and grilled focaccia.

Among the main courses are an

Asia-style Napoleon with eggplant, cauliflower, asparagus and smoked tofu with a kaffir lime and coconut sauce, and a white bean and broccoli rabe tortellini served over a ragout that includes tomato, artichokes and saffron. The restaurant's not fancy, but the black-and-white checkered floor, tablecloths and fresh produce displayed on the bar help lift the spirits and keep the place from looking like a basement.

246 McAllister St. (between Hyde and Larkin) (415) 487-9800. Dinner daily. Reservations and credit cards accepted. Prices: $12.95-$17.95

OPERA PLAZA SUSHI

Formerly Tempura House, Opera Plaza Sushi is the only Japanese restaurant in the area. Sit at the sushi bar, at one of the small tables or in a comfortable booth in one of the two dining rooms.

Sushi is good here, but if you want something more, there are plenty of options such as four kinds of donburi, teriyaki, tempura as an appetizer or entree, and sukiyaki. The seaweed salad is a particularly good starter.

601 Van Ness Ave. (in Opera Plaza) (415) 292-9997. Lunch and dinner daily. Reservations accepted for five or more. Credit cards accepted. Prices: $8.50-$13.95.

PAUL K

One of the rare newcomers to the Civic Center dining scene is this Mediterranean-inspired place, which once housed Evita Cafe. The decor is handsome, with track lighting illuminating the single room and colorful artwork adorning the walls. But all the hard surfaces can make the place very loud.

The menu changes weekly, which means you'll find some hits and misses. Good starters are the creamy baccala and the braised lamb riblets with garlic yogurt sauce. For entrees, try the pomegranate chicken breast served with sesame-flecked couscous.

Desserts can be the best part of the meal here, especially the triple layer coconut cake and the house- made sorbets.

199 Gough St. (near Oak Street) (415) 552-7132. Dinner Tuesday- Sunday, brunch Sunday. Reservations and credit cards accepted. Prices: $14-$17.

PIAF'S

If you need more entertainment after the opera or ballet, check out Piaf's. The French restaurant has live music and cabaret nightly. Decked out in shades of purple and gold, it's something of a shrine to legendary French singer Edith Piaf.

For food, customers can choose from simple bar fare such as fried calamari, a charcuterie plate and items from the raw bar. Full dinners are available, with starters such as shredded phyllo-coated crab cakes or a baby spinach salad. Entree prices have come down recently, making the bouillabaisse and steak au poivre all the more palatable.

1686 Market St. (at Gough Street) (415) 864-3700. Dinner Tuesday-Sunday. Reservations and credit cards accepted. Prices: $12.50- $19.50.

There's nowhere else near the Opera or Ballet serving soul food like they do at Powell's. Unfortunately, on a recent visit, the dining room was in dire need of steam cleaning. The good news is that the restaurant is about to be remodeled.

On the other hand, the restaurant still serves possibly the best fried chicken in the city and decent versions of fried catfish and snapper. Don't expect too much from the accompanying corn (it tastes canned) or mashed potatoes (suspiciously too smooth). But be sure to dig into some sweet potato pie for dessert -- if there's any left. The restaurant frequently runs out.

511 Hayes St. (near Octavia Street) (415) 863-1404. 9 a.m.-11 p.m. daily. No reservations. Credit cards accepted. Prices: $7.50-$12.

STARS

Once the most popular restaurant in San Francisco, Stars now has a quieter pace. That's good news for the cultural set, because it's easier to get a seat, and the bar is still one of the best in the city. There's also a bar menu where late-night diners can get pizzas, hamburgers, clams and pasta.

The interior has been redone, with hardwood floors, Oriental carpets and large, stylized paintings.

The regular menu has a selection of salads and main courses that are mostly grilled or cooked on the rotisserie, including chicken and pork loin. The menu is so straightforward that it can be disappointing, particu larly for the price.

555 Golden Gate Ave. (between Van Ness Avenue and Polk Street) (415) 861-7827. Lunch weekdays, dinner daily. Reservations and credit cards accepted. Prices: $13.50-$27.

STELLINE

This casual, old-style Italian restaurant is the less expensive sister of the budget-minded Caffe Delle Stelle. Most pastas and main courses are less than $10, and the priciest item is sauteed shrimp served over spaghetti for $12.25.

If you long for the old-fashioned Cal-Ital food of the 1950s, you'll revel in the spaghetti and meatballs and the gnocchi alla Bolognese. The menu also includes osso buco, chicken piccata and a few pizzas.

The interior has an old-world at mosphere, with its partly open kitchen, checkered tablecloths and large picture windows.

The food and service can be uneven, but it has become a popular neighborhood restaurant for those who want to fill up without spending a lot of money.

429 Gough St. (near Hayes Street) (415) 626-4292. Lunch and dinner weekdays, dinner Saturday and Sunday. Reservations and credit cards accepted. Prices: $8.50-$12.25.

SUPPENKUCHE

This popular German restaurant features well-prepared food served in a stark, almost monastic setting. Fortunately, the warm service and quick smiles make this a cheerful place to eat.

The food is ideal for the meat- and-potatoes crowd. There's a small wine list, lots of beer and great specialties. Popular items include Wiener schnitzel, sauerbraten, smoked salmon with potato pancake and a rich mushroom leek soup.

Most tables seat six or more, so you'll probably end up sharing a table with other customers, at least during part of your meal.

601 Hayes St. (at Laguna Street) (415) 252-9289. Dinner daily, brunch Sunday. Reservations for six or more. Credit cards accepted. Prices: $8.50-16.50

TAVERN GRILL

The less formal of the California Culinary Academy's dining rooms was recently spiffed up. Walls are a pretty sponged mauve, and dramatic lights hang overhead.

The Tavern features Italian dishes, including a range of pastas such as pappardelle with duck and mushrooms. Among the entrees are veal Marsala with polenta, and sea bass baked with olives and sun-dried tomatoes.

Friday and Saturday nights feature carved-to-order prime rib and pork loin buffets with a range of side dishes (and sushi on Friday), as well as desserts. Dinner is prepared by chefs-in-training, so quality can vary.

625 Polk St. (at Turk Street) (415) 292-8229. Lunch Monday-Friday, dinner Tuesday-Saturday. Reservations and credit cards accepted. Prices: $12.95-$15.95 Tuesday- Thursday, $22.95 per person buffet on Friday and Saturday.

TERRA BRAZILIS

Once a Brazilian restaurant with a strong California influence, Terra Brazilis is in transition. The owners are looking for a new chef and expanding the menu to include nuevo Latino food.

Service can be spotty -- no one answers the phone until after 5 p.m., and several messages left trying to make reservations weren't returned.

Still, there are good reasons to give the restaurant a try. Terra Brazilis is rustically beautiful, with wooden floors and exposed brick walls coupled with huge windows overlooking Laguna Street.

Even if the menu is in flux, there are many good options, such as the jicama and cucumber salad with fresh mozzarella, and the chorizo- stuffed grilled calamari. For entrees, try the feijoda completa -- a stew of black beans and pork served with rice, sauteed collard greens and sliced bananas -- or the top sirloin with a chimchurri sauce.

602 Hayes St. (at Laguna Street) (415) 241-1900. Dinner Tuesday- Sunday brunch Sunday. Reservations and credit cards accepted. Prices: $12.50-$21.

There are two reasons to go to Thai Barbecue: barbecued chicken and barbecued duck. You can order the chicken with a small green salad, with a salad and rice, in a salad or on noodles. The duck is available only on noodles. But the price is right: $5.95 for the duck and $5.50- $6.50 for the chicken, depending on how you order it.

The dining room has celery-colored walls with lavender trim, and there are fresh flowers on each table. The staff is well-versed at getting customers in and out in record time.

730 Van Ness Ave. (near Turk Street) (415) 441-1640. Lunch weekdays dinner Monday-Saturday. Reservations and credit cards accepted. Prices: $5.95-$8.95.

THEPIN THAI

Even if it weren't in the Civic Center area, Thepin would be worth visiting. Extra care is taken at every step: fresh roses on the tables, a pleasant and inexpensive wine list, and food that's a cut above. On dishes such as the green chicken curry, the chunks of zucchini are scored to produce an attractive green-and-white striped skin.

Other dishes worth ordering include the chicken coconut soup, mushroom salad, minced chicken or duck salad and "the Crying Lady," prawns in a slightly spicy sauce.

The staff is also geared toward the theater crowd, so you can get in and out without a worry.

298 Gough St. (at Fell Street) (415) 863-9335. Lunch weekdays dinner daily. Reservations, credit cards accepted. Prices: $7.95-$10.95

VICOLO

This is a quick and easy stop when you're in a rush and crave some of the city's best pizza. Choose from dozens of toppings for the cornmeal-dusted crust, either a whole pie or by the slice. Then maybe add a salad, which is big enough for two. One of the best features a bed of greens topped with beets, walnuts and blue cheese. The menu also includes lasagna and a succulent roast chicken with caramelized onions and roast potatoes.

At Vicolo customers order at the counter, and the food is brought to the table. The '80s warehouse look and cathedral ceiling make the interior seem a bit impersonal, but the food makes up for it.

201 Ivy St. (at Franklin Street) (415) 863-2382. Lunch and dinner daily. No reservations. Credit cards accepted. Prices: $8.95-$22 for a 12- inch pizza.

Whether there's a performance or not, Zuni is always packed. The wedged-shaped building makes for interesting angles in the interior, and the wood-burning oven and bar overlooking Market Street give the restaurant its trademark energy. However, it's the people and the food that make this place enticing. No other restaurant boasts such a diverse clientele.

The specialties are almost too numerous to name: Caesar salad, polenta with mascarpone or Parmesan, house-cured anchovies, roast chicken for two.

1658 Market St. (near Franklin Street) (415) 552-2522. Lunch and dinner Tuesday-Sunday. Prices: $10-$24.


  • Fast food giant McDonald's included the Jerk Chicken Sandwich in festive menu
  • But people on social media believe the burger amounts to cultural appropriation
  • Jerk is a style of cooking originally from Jamaica and involves spice and pepper

Published: 17:16 BST, 25 November 2020 | Updated: 23:27 BST, 25 November 2020

Fast food giant McDonald's has been accused of 'cultural appropriation at its finest' over one of its new Christmas menu items.

The chain announced a new Jerk Chicken Sandwich for its festive menu, which also features a double Big Mac and a Celebrations McFlurry.

But it is the Jerk Chicken Sandwich which has caused the biggest stir - and not all for the right reasons.

While some have taken to social media to praise the burger, others have hit out at McDonald's accusing them of 'cultural appropriation'.

Cultural appropriation is the adoption of an element or elements of one culture or identity by members of another culture or identity.

It is particularly controversial when members of a dominant culture appropriate from disadvantaged minority cultures.

Jerk chicken originates from Jamaica and is believed by historians to come from indigenous Taino people and Maroons - descendants of Africans who were enslaved in the Caribbean islands.

One person tweeted: 'The more I think about it the more I'm bothered by the McDonald's 'jerk chicken' attempt.

The chain announced a new Jerk Chicken Sandwich for its festive menu, which also features a double Big Mac and a Celebrations McFlurry

What is jerk?

Jerk is a seasoning for meat and fish which originated from Jamaica.

Jerk refers to a style of cooking in which the main ingredient— most often chicken but which can be other meats and fish - is coated in spices and slow-cooked over a fire or grill.

The food has its origins with the Taino - the indigenous people of the Caribbean - who developed the jerk method and later taught it to African people who had been enslaved and forced over to the Caribbean. They in turn adapted it in creating jerk chicken.

The first jerk recipes can be dated back to the year 1655.

It comes in two forms, a dry seasoning that is rubbed onto meat or fish, or a wet marinade used in the same way.

The two key ingredients are allspice and Scotch bonnet peppers. Other ingredients can include: ginger, salt, brown sugar, garlic, thyme, cloves, scallions, nutmeg and cinnamon.

'It shows me one of two things: 1) They don't care to respect the culture or 2) They have zero diversity on their team.'

Another said: 'Jerk Chicken Sandwich, yet there is not one McDonalds in Jamaica.'

One person tweeted: 'Who approved McDonald's Jerk Chicken Sandwich?'

Another added: 'Disrespect to the fullest. McDonald's slapped a dead sauce on top of a crispy chicken and called it Jerk Chicken Sandwich, unreal.'

The new sandwich, costing £4.39, features two crispy Chicken Selects topped with a spicy jerk sauce, bacon, pepper jack cheese, onion and lettuce in a sourdough bun.

The burger's jerk sauce contains tomato paste, Habanero chilli puree, caramelised sugar syrup, spices, garlic, ginger and basil, according to the McDonald's website.

The ingredients in a real jerk marinade are allspice - a dried unripe berry of the South American native plant Pimenta dioica - and Scotch bonnet peppers.

One Twitter user posted: 'Tried the new McDonald's 'jerk chicken' burger yesterday, and as a man of Caribbean descent, I can categorically confirm that 2 Chicken Selects with some of Levi roots reggae reggae sauce is in fact not jerk chicken at all.'

One woman on Facebook complained: 'How is this jerk? Cultural appropriation yet again.'

But while the burger took criticism over claims of cultural appropriation, others praised the burger and its taste.

The ingredients in a real jerk marinade are allspice - a dried unripe berry of the South American native plant Pimenta dioica - and Scotch bonnet peppers

One Twitter user said: 'Oh my days that jerk chicken sandwich off Xmas menu at Mcdees is straight 15/10.'

Another added: 'That jerk chicken sandwich from maccies with the cheese dippers is another level.'

A spokesperson for McDonald's told MailOnline: 'Our Jerk Chicken Sandwich uses jerk seasoning in its spicy sauce. In the product description, we make it clear that the sauce is the jerk component of the sandwich.'


McDonald's is launching a new breakfast roll in the UK this week

McDonald's is expanding its popular breakfast menu this week - with a new bacon, sausage, egg and cheese roll landing in the UK on Wednesday.

On October 21, the all-new Breakfast Roll will launch in restaurants after a successful trial in Ireland.

It comes as the chain's famous breakfast wrap remains off the menu, after being temporarily discontinued over lockdown.

The new roll contains back bacon, a sausage patty, cheese and a free-range egg.

The roll will be priced at £2.79 - and will be served daily from 5am until 11am.

The new breakfast roll will be priced at £2.79 (Image: McDonald's)

It follows the launch of three new burgers - including a new spicy quarter pounder - earlier this month.

On 7 October, McDonald's launched three new quarter pounder varieties, alongside new cheesy nacho wedges and a salted caramel latte.

The spicy burger is described as "a mouth-watering 100% beef quarter pounder patty, with two slices of pepper jack cheese, onions, jalapenos, mustard and a spicy ketchup in a sesame seed bun".

And the deluxe? Well, as well as beef, it contains "shredded lettuce, a slice of tomato, slice of cheese, pickles, fresh onions, cool mayo, ketchup, mustard, and streaky bacon all in a round sesame topped bun".

A new McChicken BLT has also launched as part of the limited edition menu that will run until November 17.

All the new items launching at McDonald's this month

New chicken options, nacho cheese wedges and salted caramel lattes have arrived (Image: McDonalds)


Watch the video: McDonalds at Midnight (September 2021).