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The Ultimate Edible Underwear Taste Test (Slideshow)

The Ultimate Edible Underwear Taste Test (Slideshow)

Are you actually supposed to eat this stuff?

Dan Myers

No giggling. This is science.

The Setup

Dan Myers

No giggling. This is science.

7) Cotton Candy Briefs

Jane Bruce

No cotton candy flavor here whatsoever, just a mouthful of chemicals. "Tastes like a balloon filled with Robitussin," said one taster. Managed to be both flavorless and harshly off-putting.

6) Strawberry Champagne Thong

Jane Bruce

"Tastes of neither strawberry nor champagne," said one taster. "I think they just put a new label on a bad batch of strawberry."

5) Passion Fruit Thong

Jane Bruce

"Gross," wrote more than one taster. "Kill me," another. It tasted just like all the other red ones, but with a slightly different chemical note. Did a professional food scientist actually develop these things?

4) Passion Fruit Briefs

Jane Bruce

"I feel like the men’s taste better than the women’s," one taster noted.

3) Chocolate Thong

Jane Bruce

A slight change of pace from "chemical red" flavor, "chemical brown" maybe, just maybe, tasted a tiny bit like some sort of super-synthetic chocolate.

2) Cherry Briefs

Jane Bruce

Surprisingly, possibly because cherry is an artificial flavor that’s been just about perfected over the years, these actually tasted a bit like something containing artificial cherry flavoring as opposed to just "pink" flavoring. Still, gross.

1) Strawberry Chocolate Briefs

Jane Bruce

The fact that this contained two flavors, and thus the slightest amount of contrast, put it ahead of the others. One bite was still enough, though.

If you happen to find yourself in the market for edible underwear, this one and cherry are probably your best bet from a flavor standpoint, but honestly, if you’re really desperate to get food involved in the bedroom just use whipped cream, or chocolate syrup, or something. Hell, fashion your own pair out of Fruit Roll-Ups. At least it’s made out of food.


The Ultimate Edible Underwear Taste Test (Slideshow) - Recipes

Title: Classic children’s library: 8-11

Author: The Guardian Newspaper

The Internet, Online, 16/10/2015

This is the age at which reading starts to get interesting, both for you and them. Around now most children will be reading fluently on their own and will start to develop their own distinct taste in books, although, like aliens, yo-yos and skipping, particular writers go in and out of fashion in the playground.

It would, however, be a pity if you and your children stopped reading together at this point. You will both miss the closeness, and you will also miss some really good stories. This is the moment when your childhood reading and that of your own children’s meet and meld as you introduce them to E. Nesbit and Phillipa Pearce and they take you on flights of the imagination with Philip Ridley and JK Rowling. As every parent with children in this age range knows, a thorough grounding in the rules of quidditch is essential if you are to have any meaningful conversation with your children.

A word of warning. Take care when trying to introduce the books you loved or think you loved as a child to your own. Often your memory will be hazy as to exactly what age you were when you read it – you were almost certainly older than you think. There is sometimes a density to the writing of many of the older classics, which can be very satisfying, but which can also be a turn-off to a generation raised on the Oxford Reading Tree and Ginn. They will probably be appreciated in time, but read them The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe in the cradle and they’ll firmly slam the door shut on you. Every child is different in their reading ability and their interests, and parents need to take their cue from the child.

Remember, a book which sports the label “classic” isn’t intrinsically better for your children than one which does not. Books are not medicine to be forced down they should be fun, exciting doorways into other worlds and different feelings and points of view. The best books for this age group do not inform children about the world, but present it to them as a transformation. Best books. What does that mean? Between 8-11 there is no such thing as a bad book, it is the habit of reading that counts. Don’t get prissy and ban Enid Blyton. The child who thrills to the adventure of The Secret of Killimoon is only a step away from the excitement of Philip Ridley’s Kasper in the Glitter.

For some children this is also the age when books become friends, the same one consumed over and over in the same way that a teenager will play the same track on a new CD over and over. Assume, if this is the case, that the child is getting something crucial from it in the same way that the child who demands cheese three times a day for a week is probably unconsciously seeking some essential nutrient. At this age, books can be the most satisfying food in the world.


The Ultimate Edible Underwear Taste Test (Slideshow) - Recipes

Title: Classic children’s library: 8-11

Author: The Guardian Newspaper

The Internet, Online, 16/10/2015

This is the age at which reading starts to get interesting, both for you and them. Around now most children will be reading fluently on their own and will start to develop their own distinct taste in books, although, like aliens, yo-yos and skipping, particular writers go in and out of fashion in the playground.

It would, however, be a pity if you and your children stopped reading together at this point. You will both miss the closeness, and you will also miss some really good stories. This is the moment when your childhood reading and that of your own children’s meet and meld as you introduce them to E. Nesbit and Phillipa Pearce and they take you on flights of the imagination with Philip Ridley and JK Rowling. As every parent with children in this age range knows, a thorough grounding in the rules of quidditch is essential if you are to have any meaningful conversation with your children.

A word of warning. Take care when trying to introduce the books you loved or think you loved as a child to your own. Often your memory will be hazy as to exactly what age you were when you read it – you were almost certainly older than you think. There is sometimes a density to the writing of many of the older classics, which can be very satisfying, but which can also be a turn-off to a generation raised on the Oxford Reading Tree and Ginn. They will probably be appreciated in time, but read them The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe in the cradle and they’ll firmly slam the door shut on you. Every child is different in their reading ability and their interests, and parents need to take their cue from the child.

Remember, a book which sports the label “classic” isn’t intrinsically better for your children than one which does not. Books are not medicine to be forced down they should be fun, exciting doorways into other worlds and different feelings and points of view. The best books for this age group do not inform children about the world, but present it to them as a transformation. Best books. What does that mean? Between 8-11 there is no such thing as a bad book, it is the habit of reading that counts. Don’t get prissy and ban Enid Blyton. The child who thrills to the adventure of The Secret of Killimoon is only a step away from the excitement of Philip Ridley’s Kasper in the Glitter.

For some children this is also the age when books become friends, the same one consumed over and over in the same way that a teenager will play the same track on a new CD over and over. Assume, if this is the case, that the child is getting something crucial from it in the same way that the child who demands cheese three times a day for a week is probably unconsciously seeking some essential nutrient. At this age, books can be the most satisfying food in the world.


The Ultimate Edible Underwear Taste Test (Slideshow) - Recipes

Title: Classic children’s library: 8-11

Author: The Guardian Newspaper

The Internet, Online, 16/10/2015

This is the age at which reading starts to get interesting, both for you and them. Around now most children will be reading fluently on their own and will start to develop their own distinct taste in books, although, like aliens, yo-yos and skipping, particular writers go in and out of fashion in the playground.

It would, however, be a pity if you and your children stopped reading together at this point. You will both miss the closeness, and you will also miss some really good stories. This is the moment when your childhood reading and that of your own children’s meet and meld as you introduce them to E. Nesbit and Phillipa Pearce and they take you on flights of the imagination with Philip Ridley and JK Rowling. As every parent with children in this age range knows, a thorough grounding in the rules of quidditch is essential if you are to have any meaningful conversation with your children.

A word of warning. Take care when trying to introduce the books you loved or think you loved as a child to your own. Often your memory will be hazy as to exactly what age you were when you read it – you were almost certainly older than you think. There is sometimes a density to the writing of many of the older classics, which can be very satisfying, but which can also be a turn-off to a generation raised on the Oxford Reading Tree and Ginn. They will probably be appreciated in time, but read them The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe in the cradle and they’ll firmly slam the door shut on you. Every child is different in their reading ability and their interests, and parents need to take their cue from the child.

Remember, a book which sports the label “classic” isn’t intrinsically better for your children than one which does not. Books are not medicine to be forced down they should be fun, exciting doorways into other worlds and different feelings and points of view. The best books for this age group do not inform children about the world, but present it to them as a transformation. Best books. What does that mean? Between 8-11 there is no such thing as a bad book, it is the habit of reading that counts. Don’t get prissy and ban Enid Blyton. The child who thrills to the adventure of The Secret of Killimoon is only a step away from the excitement of Philip Ridley’s Kasper in the Glitter.

For some children this is also the age when books become friends, the same one consumed over and over in the same way that a teenager will play the same track on a new CD over and over. Assume, if this is the case, that the child is getting something crucial from it in the same way that the child who demands cheese three times a day for a week is probably unconsciously seeking some essential nutrient. At this age, books can be the most satisfying food in the world.


The Ultimate Edible Underwear Taste Test (Slideshow) - Recipes

Title: Classic children’s library: 8-11

Author: The Guardian Newspaper

The Internet, Online, 16/10/2015

This is the age at which reading starts to get interesting, both for you and them. Around now most children will be reading fluently on their own and will start to develop their own distinct taste in books, although, like aliens, yo-yos and skipping, particular writers go in and out of fashion in the playground.

It would, however, be a pity if you and your children stopped reading together at this point. You will both miss the closeness, and you will also miss some really good stories. This is the moment when your childhood reading and that of your own children’s meet and meld as you introduce them to E. Nesbit and Phillipa Pearce and they take you on flights of the imagination with Philip Ridley and JK Rowling. As every parent with children in this age range knows, a thorough grounding in the rules of quidditch is essential if you are to have any meaningful conversation with your children.

A word of warning. Take care when trying to introduce the books you loved or think you loved as a child to your own. Often your memory will be hazy as to exactly what age you were when you read it – you were almost certainly older than you think. There is sometimes a density to the writing of many of the older classics, which can be very satisfying, but which can also be a turn-off to a generation raised on the Oxford Reading Tree and Ginn. They will probably be appreciated in time, but read them The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe in the cradle and they’ll firmly slam the door shut on you. Every child is different in their reading ability and their interests, and parents need to take their cue from the child.

Remember, a book which sports the label “classic” isn’t intrinsically better for your children than one which does not. Books are not medicine to be forced down they should be fun, exciting doorways into other worlds and different feelings and points of view. The best books for this age group do not inform children about the world, but present it to them as a transformation. Best books. What does that mean? Between 8-11 there is no such thing as a bad book, it is the habit of reading that counts. Don’t get prissy and ban Enid Blyton. The child who thrills to the adventure of The Secret of Killimoon is only a step away from the excitement of Philip Ridley’s Kasper in the Glitter.

For some children this is also the age when books become friends, the same one consumed over and over in the same way that a teenager will play the same track on a new CD over and over. Assume, if this is the case, that the child is getting something crucial from it in the same way that the child who demands cheese three times a day for a week is probably unconsciously seeking some essential nutrient. At this age, books can be the most satisfying food in the world.


The Ultimate Edible Underwear Taste Test (Slideshow) - Recipes

Title: Classic children’s library: 8-11

Author: The Guardian Newspaper

The Internet, Online, 16/10/2015

This is the age at which reading starts to get interesting, both for you and them. Around now most children will be reading fluently on their own and will start to develop their own distinct taste in books, although, like aliens, yo-yos and skipping, particular writers go in and out of fashion in the playground.

It would, however, be a pity if you and your children stopped reading together at this point. You will both miss the closeness, and you will also miss some really good stories. This is the moment when your childhood reading and that of your own children’s meet and meld as you introduce them to E. Nesbit and Phillipa Pearce and they take you on flights of the imagination with Philip Ridley and JK Rowling. As every parent with children in this age range knows, a thorough grounding in the rules of quidditch is essential if you are to have any meaningful conversation with your children.

A word of warning. Take care when trying to introduce the books you loved or think you loved as a child to your own. Often your memory will be hazy as to exactly what age you were when you read it – you were almost certainly older than you think. There is sometimes a density to the writing of many of the older classics, which can be very satisfying, but which can also be a turn-off to a generation raised on the Oxford Reading Tree and Ginn. They will probably be appreciated in time, but read them The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe in the cradle and they’ll firmly slam the door shut on you. Every child is different in their reading ability and their interests, and parents need to take their cue from the child.

Remember, a book which sports the label “classic” isn’t intrinsically better for your children than one which does not. Books are not medicine to be forced down they should be fun, exciting doorways into other worlds and different feelings and points of view. The best books for this age group do not inform children about the world, but present it to them as a transformation. Best books. What does that mean? Between 8-11 there is no such thing as a bad book, it is the habit of reading that counts. Don’t get prissy and ban Enid Blyton. The child who thrills to the adventure of The Secret of Killimoon is only a step away from the excitement of Philip Ridley’s Kasper in the Glitter.

For some children this is also the age when books become friends, the same one consumed over and over in the same way that a teenager will play the same track on a new CD over and over. Assume, if this is the case, that the child is getting something crucial from it in the same way that the child who demands cheese three times a day for a week is probably unconsciously seeking some essential nutrient. At this age, books can be the most satisfying food in the world.


The Ultimate Edible Underwear Taste Test (Slideshow) - Recipes

Title: Classic children’s library: 8-11

Author: The Guardian Newspaper

The Internet, Online, 16/10/2015

This is the age at which reading starts to get interesting, both for you and them. Around now most children will be reading fluently on their own and will start to develop their own distinct taste in books, although, like aliens, yo-yos and skipping, particular writers go in and out of fashion in the playground.

It would, however, be a pity if you and your children stopped reading together at this point. You will both miss the closeness, and you will also miss some really good stories. This is the moment when your childhood reading and that of your own children’s meet and meld as you introduce them to E. Nesbit and Phillipa Pearce and they take you on flights of the imagination with Philip Ridley and JK Rowling. As every parent with children in this age range knows, a thorough grounding in the rules of quidditch is essential if you are to have any meaningful conversation with your children.

A word of warning. Take care when trying to introduce the books you loved or think you loved as a child to your own. Often your memory will be hazy as to exactly what age you were when you read it – you were almost certainly older than you think. There is sometimes a density to the writing of many of the older classics, which can be very satisfying, but which can also be a turn-off to a generation raised on the Oxford Reading Tree and Ginn. They will probably be appreciated in time, but read them The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe in the cradle and they’ll firmly slam the door shut on you. Every child is different in their reading ability and their interests, and parents need to take their cue from the child.

Remember, a book which sports the label “classic” isn’t intrinsically better for your children than one which does not. Books are not medicine to be forced down they should be fun, exciting doorways into other worlds and different feelings and points of view. The best books for this age group do not inform children about the world, but present it to them as a transformation. Best books. What does that mean? Between 8-11 there is no such thing as a bad book, it is the habit of reading that counts. Don’t get prissy and ban Enid Blyton. The child who thrills to the adventure of The Secret of Killimoon is only a step away from the excitement of Philip Ridley’s Kasper in the Glitter.

For some children this is also the age when books become friends, the same one consumed over and over in the same way that a teenager will play the same track on a new CD over and over. Assume, if this is the case, that the child is getting something crucial from it in the same way that the child who demands cheese three times a day for a week is probably unconsciously seeking some essential nutrient. At this age, books can be the most satisfying food in the world.


The Ultimate Edible Underwear Taste Test (Slideshow) - Recipes

Title: Classic children’s library: 8-11

Author: The Guardian Newspaper

The Internet, Online, 16/10/2015

This is the age at which reading starts to get interesting, both for you and them. Around now most children will be reading fluently on their own and will start to develop their own distinct taste in books, although, like aliens, yo-yos and skipping, particular writers go in and out of fashion in the playground.

It would, however, be a pity if you and your children stopped reading together at this point. You will both miss the closeness, and you will also miss some really good stories. This is the moment when your childhood reading and that of your own children’s meet and meld as you introduce them to E. Nesbit and Phillipa Pearce and they take you on flights of the imagination with Philip Ridley and JK Rowling. As every parent with children in this age range knows, a thorough grounding in the rules of quidditch is essential if you are to have any meaningful conversation with your children.

A word of warning. Take care when trying to introduce the books you loved or think you loved as a child to your own. Often your memory will be hazy as to exactly what age you were when you read it – you were almost certainly older than you think. There is sometimes a density to the writing of many of the older classics, which can be very satisfying, but which can also be a turn-off to a generation raised on the Oxford Reading Tree and Ginn. They will probably be appreciated in time, but read them The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe in the cradle and they’ll firmly slam the door shut on you. Every child is different in their reading ability and their interests, and parents need to take their cue from the child.

Remember, a book which sports the label “classic” isn’t intrinsically better for your children than one which does not. Books are not medicine to be forced down they should be fun, exciting doorways into other worlds and different feelings and points of view. The best books for this age group do not inform children about the world, but present it to them as a transformation. Best books. What does that mean? Between 8-11 there is no such thing as a bad book, it is the habit of reading that counts. Don’t get prissy and ban Enid Blyton. The child who thrills to the adventure of The Secret of Killimoon is only a step away from the excitement of Philip Ridley’s Kasper in the Glitter.

For some children this is also the age when books become friends, the same one consumed over and over in the same way that a teenager will play the same track on a new CD over and over. Assume, if this is the case, that the child is getting something crucial from it in the same way that the child who demands cheese three times a day for a week is probably unconsciously seeking some essential nutrient. At this age, books can be the most satisfying food in the world.


The Ultimate Edible Underwear Taste Test (Slideshow) - Recipes

Title: Classic children’s library: 8-11

Author: The Guardian Newspaper

The Internet, Online, 16/10/2015

This is the age at which reading starts to get interesting, both for you and them. Around now most children will be reading fluently on their own and will start to develop their own distinct taste in books, although, like aliens, yo-yos and skipping, particular writers go in and out of fashion in the playground.

It would, however, be a pity if you and your children stopped reading together at this point. You will both miss the closeness, and you will also miss some really good stories. This is the moment when your childhood reading and that of your own children’s meet and meld as you introduce them to E. Nesbit and Phillipa Pearce and they take you on flights of the imagination with Philip Ridley and JK Rowling. As every parent with children in this age range knows, a thorough grounding in the rules of quidditch is essential if you are to have any meaningful conversation with your children.

A word of warning. Take care when trying to introduce the books you loved or think you loved as a child to your own. Often your memory will be hazy as to exactly what age you were when you read it – you were almost certainly older than you think. There is sometimes a density to the writing of many of the older classics, which can be very satisfying, but which can also be a turn-off to a generation raised on the Oxford Reading Tree and Ginn. They will probably be appreciated in time, but read them The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe in the cradle and they’ll firmly slam the door shut on you. Every child is different in their reading ability and their interests, and parents need to take their cue from the child.

Remember, a book which sports the label “classic” isn’t intrinsically better for your children than one which does not. Books are not medicine to be forced down they should be fun, exciting doorways into other worlds and different feelings and points of view. The best books for this age group do not inform children about the world, but present it to them as a transformation. Best books. What does that mean? Between 8-11 there is no such thing as a bad book, it is the habit of reading that counts. Don’t get prissy and ban Enid Blyton. The child who thrills to the adventure of The Secret of Killimoon is only a step away from the excitement of Philip Ridley’s Kasper in the Glitter.

For some children this is also the age when books become friends, the same one consumed over and over in the same way that a teenager will play the same track on a new CD over and over. Assume, if this is the case, that the child is getting something crucial from it in the same way that the child who demands cheese three times a day for a week is probably unconsciously seeking some essential nutrient. At this age, books can be the most satisfying food in the world.


The Ultimate Edible Underwear Taste Test (Slideshow) - Recipes

Title: Classic children’s library: 8-11

Author: The Guardian Newspaper

The Internet, Online, 16/10/2015

This is the age at which reading starts to get interesting, both for you and them. Around now most children will be reading fluently on their own and will start to develop their own distinct taste in books, although, like aliens, yo-yos and skipping, particular writers go in and out of fashion in the playground.

It would, however, be a pity if you and your children stopped reading together at this point. You will both miss the closeness, and you will also miss some really good stories. This is the moment when your childhood reading and that of your own children’s meet and meld as you introduce them to E. Nesbit and Phillipa Pearce and they take you on flights of the imagination with Philip Ridley and JK Rowling. As every parent with children in this age range knows, a thorough grounding in the rules of quidditch is essential if you are to have any meaningful conversation with your children.

A word of warning. Take care when trying to introduce the books you loved or think you loved as a child to your own. Often your memory will be hazy as to exactly what age you were when you read it – you were almost certainly older than you think. There is sometimes a density to the writing of many of the older classics, which can be very satisfying, but which can also be a turn-off to a generation raised on the Oxford Reading Tree and Ginn. They will probably be appreciated in time, but read them The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe in the cradle and they’ll firmly slam the door shut on you. Every child is different in their reading ability and their interests, and parents need to take their cue from the child.

Remember, a book which sports the label “classic” isn’t intrinsically better for your children than one which does not. Books are not medicine to be forced down they should be fun, exciting doorways into other worlds and different feelings and points of view. The best books for this age group do not inform children about the world, but present it to them as a transformation. Best books. What does that mean? Between 8-11 there is no such thing as a bad book, it is the habit of reading that counts. Don’t get prissy and ban Enid Blyton. The child who thrills to the adventure of The Secret of Killimoon is only a step away from the excitement of Philip Ridley’s Kasper in the Glitter.

For some children this is also the age when books become friends, the same one consumed over and over in the same way that a teenager will play the same track on a new CD over and over. Assume, if this is the case, that the child is getting something crucial from it in the same way that the child who demands cheese three times a day for a week is probably unconsciously seeking some essential nutrient. At this age, books can be the most satisfying food in the world.


The Ultimate Edible Underwear Taste Test (Slideshow) - Recipes

Title: Classic children’s library: 8-11

Author: The Guardian Newspaper

The Internet, Online, 16/10/2015

This is the age at which reading starts to get interesting, both for you and them. Around now most children will be reading fluently on their own and will start to develop their own distinct taste in books, although, like aliens, yo-yos and skipping, particular writers go in and out of fashion in the playground.

It would, however, be a pity if you and your children stopped reading together at this point. You will both miss the closeness, and you will also miss some really good stories. This is the moment when your childhood reading and that of your own children’s meet and meld as you introduce them to E. Nesbit and Phillipa Pearce and they take you on flights of the imagination with Philip Ridley and JK Rowling. As every parent with children in this age range knows, a thorough grounding in the rules of quidditch is essential if you are to have any meaningful conversation with your children.

A word of warning. Take care when trying to introduce the books you loved or think you loved as a child to your own. Often your memory will be hazy as to exactly what age you were when you read it – you were almost certainly older than you think. There is sometimes a density to the writing of many of the older classics, which can be very satisfying, but which can also be a turn-off to a generation raised on the Oxford Reading Tree and Ginn. They will probably be appreciated in time, but read them The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe in the cradle and they’ll firmly slam the door shut on you. Every child is different in their reading ability and their interests, and parents need to take their cue from the child.

Remember, a book which sports the label “classic” isn’t intrinsically better for your children than one which does not. Books are not medicine to be forced down they should be fun, exciting doorways into other worlds and different feelings and points of view. The best books for this age group do not inform children about the world, but present it to them as a transformation. Best books. What does that mean? Between 8-11 there is no such thing as a bad book, it is the habit of reading that counts. Don’t get prissy and ban Enid Blyton. The child who thrills to the adventure of The Secret of Killimoon is only a step away from the excitement of Philip Ridley’s Kasper in the Glitter.

For some children this is also the age when books become friends, the same one consumed over and over in the same way that a teenager will play the same track on a new CD over and over. Assume, if this is the case, that the child is getting something crucial from it in the same way that the child who demands cheese three times a day for a week is probably unconsciously seeking some essential nutrient. At this age, books can be the most satisfying food in the world.


Watch the video: The Edible Underwear Tier List (December 2021).