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Overeating Linked to Memory Loss

Overeating Linked to Memory Loss

Researchers have found a correlation between calorie intake and mild cognitive impairment in the elderly

Another cautionary tale against overeating: Researchers from the Mayo Clinic have found a correlation between eating more and memory loss.

The study surveyed a random sample of 1,233 people 70 to 89 years old, finding that those who ate more calories also had a higher rate of mild cognitive impairment (MCI), the stage between normal memory loss and Alzheimer's disease.

Researchers found that the chances of having MCI more than doubled in the higher calorie group (2,143 to 6,000 calories consumed daily) when compared to the lower calorie group (600 to 1,526).

Of course this is just preliminary research, and the study authors plan to investigate the cause of the correlation. Furthermore, the study did not report on the types of calories consumed, or when or how often food was eaten.

Study researcher Yonas Geda told Live Science that in the future, they will look at the effects of types of food, as well as exercise. "In this particular study we did not adjust for physical exercise. I think we are going to do that as well as look at the macronutrients, such as carbohydrates and proteins, to see which ones might be of concern," he said.


What does rosemary do to your brain?

In scientific terms there are different kinds of memory.

There's past memory - your experiences and what you learned at school. There's present memory, which is your working minute-to-minute memory. And there's future memory or "remembering to remember".

This is for many of us the trickiest one. When it fails bad things happen - we forget to take our vital heart medicine or worse still to buy our spouse's birthday presents. It's the reason letters decompose in my back pocket over months even though I cycle past a postbox every day.

There are plenty of examples of people who have enormously improved their past memories, committing decks of cards to memory or whole new languages. But remembering to remember is more complicated. Like most people I would do almost anything for an improved future memory.

Medicine has little to offer. There are some drugs for treating the memory loss that happens with dementia but they are not hugely effective. They give some measurable benefits but whether they are "clinically significant" is controversial. Certainly they are no miracle cure for people with dementia, nor do they improve the memory of anyone else.

So I was not that hopeful travelling up to Newcastle to see Prof Mark Moss at Northumbria University. His team is running an experiment to test whether rosemary essential oil could benefit future memory. I'll be honest - this seemed hokey.

Rosemary has been linked to memory for hundreds of years. Ophelia in Hamlet says to her brother Laertes: "There's rosemary, that's for remembrance." But that's no kind of basis for a study. She had after all gone insane after the death of her father and was to kill herself shortly after this scene.


What does rosemary do to your brain?

In scientific terms there are different kinds of memory.

There's past memory - your experiences and what you learned at school. There's present memory, which is your working minute-to-minute memory. And there's future memory or "remembering to remember".

This is for many of us the trickiest one. When it fails bad things happen - we forget to take our vital heart medicine or worse still to buy our spouse's birthday presents. It's the reason letters decompose in my back pocket over months even though I cycle past a postbox every day.

There are plenty of examples of people who have enormously improved their past memories, committing decks of cards to memory or whole new languages. But remembering to remember is more complicated. Like most people I would do almost anything for an improved future memory.

Medicine has little to offer. There are some drugs for treating the memory loss that happens with dementia but they are not hugely effective. They give some measurable benefits but whether they are "clinically significant" is controversial. Certainly they are no miracle cure for people with dementia, nor do they improve the memory of anyone else.

So I was not that hopeful travelling up to Newcastle to see Prof Mark Moss at Northumbria University. His team is running an experiment to test whether rosemary essential oil could benefit future memory. I'll be honest - this seemed hokey.

Rosemary has been linked to memory for hundreds of years. Ophelia in Hamlet says to her brother Laertes: "There's rosemary, that's for remembrance." But that's no kind of basis for a study. She had after all gone insane after the death of her father and was to kill herself shortly after this scene.


What does rosemary do to your brain?

In scientific terms there are different kinds of memory.

There's past memory - your experiences and what you learned at school. There's present memory, which is your working minute-to-minute memory. And there's future memory or "remembering to remember".

This is for many of us the trickiest one. When it fails bad things happen - we forget to take our vital heart medicine or worse still to buy our spouse's birthday presents. It's the reason letters decompose in my back pocket over months even though I cycle past a postbox every day.

There are plenty of examples of people who have enormously improved their past memories, committing decks of cards to memory or whole new languages. But remembering to remember is more complicated. Like most people I would do almost anything for an improved future memory.

Medicine has little to offer. There are some drugs for treating the memory loss that happens with dementia but they are not hugely effective. They give some measurable benefits but whether they are "clinically significant" is controversial. Certainly they are no miracle cure for people with dementia, nor do they improve the memory of anyone else.

So I was not that hopeful travelling up to Newcastle to see Prof Mark Moss at Northumbria University. His team is running an experiment to test whether rosemary essential oil could benefit future memory. I'll be honest - this seemed hokey.

Rosemary has been linked to memory for hundreds of years. Ophelia in Hamlet says to her brother Laertes: "There's rosemary, that's for remembrance." But that's no kind of basis for a study. She had after all gone insane after the death of her father and was to kill herself shortly after this scene.


What does rosemary do to your brain?

In scientific terms there are different kinds of memory.

There's past memory - your experiences and what you learned at school. There's present memory, which is your working minute-to-minute memory. And there's future memory or "remembering to remember".

This is for many of us the trickiest one. When it fails bad things happen - we forget to take our vital heart medicine or worse still to buy our spouse's birthday presents. It's the reason letters decompose in my back pocket over months even though I cycle past a postbox every day.

There are plenty of examples of people who have enormously improved their past memories, committing decks of cards to memory or whole new languages. But remembering to remember is more complicated. Like most people I would do almost anything for an improved future memory.

Medicine has little to offer. There are some drugs for treating the memory loss that happens with dementia but they are not hugely effective. They give some measurable benefits but whether they are "clinically significant" is controversial. Certainly they are no miracle cure for people with dementia, nor do they improve the memory of anyone else.

So I was not that hopeful travelling up to Newcastle to see Prof Mark Moss at Northumbria University. His team is running an experiment to test whether rosemary essential oil could benefit future memory. I'll be honest - this seemed hokey.

Rosemary has been linked to memory for hundreds of years. Ophelia in Hamlet says to her brother Laertes: "There's rosemary, that's for remembrance." But that's no kind of basis for a study. She had after all gone insane after the death of her father and was to kill herself shortly after this scene.


What does rosemary do to your brain?

In scientific terms there are different kinds of memory.

There's past memory - your experiences and what you learned at school. There's present memory, which is your working minute-to-minute memory. And there's future memory or "remembering to remember".

This is for many of us the trickiest one. When it fails bad things happen - we forget to take our vital heart medicine or worse still to buy our spouse's birthday presents. It's the reason letters decompose in my back pocket over months even though I cycle past a postbox every day.

There are plenty of examples of people who have enormously improved their past memories, committing decks of cards to memory or whole new languages. But remembering to remember is more complicated. Like most people I would do almost anything for an improved future memory.

Medicine has little to offer. There are some drugs for treating the memory loss that happens with dementia but they are not hugely effective. They give some measurable benefits but whether they are "clinically significant" is controversial. Certainly they are no miracle cure for people with dementia, nor do they improve the memory of anyone else.

So I was not that hopeful travelling up to Newcastle to see Prof Mark Moss at Northumbria University. His team is running an experiment to test whether rosemary essential oil could benefit future memory. I'll be honest - this seemed hokey.

Rosemary has been linked to memory for hundreds of years. Ophelia in Hamlet says to her brother Laertes: "There's rosemary, that's for remembrance." But that's no kind of basis for a study. She had after all gone insane after the death of her father and was to kill herself shortly after this scene.


What does rosemary do to your brain?

In scientific terms there are different kinds of memory.

There's past memory - your experiences and what you learned at school. There's present memory, which is your working minute-to-minute memory. And there's future memory or "remembering to remember".

This is for many of us the trickiest one. When it fails bad things happen - we forget to take our vital heart medicine or worse still to buy our spouse's birthday presents. It's the reason letters decompose in my back pocket over months even though I cycle past a postbox every day.

There are plenty of examples of people who have enormously improved their past memories, committing decks of cards to memory or whole new languages. But remembering to remember is more complicated. Like most people I would do almost anything for an improved future memory.

Medicine has little to offer. There are some drugs for treating the memory loss that happens with dementia but they are not hugely effective. They give some measurable benefits but whether they are "clinically significant" is controversial. Certainly they are no miracle cure for people with dementia, nor do they improve the memory of anyone else.

So I was not that hopeful travelling up to Newcastle to see Prof Mark Moss at Northumbria University. His team is running an experiment to test whether rosemary essential oil could benefit future memory. I'll be honest - this seemed hokey.

Rosemary has been linked to memory for hundreds of years. Ophelia in Hamlet says to her brother Laertes: "There's rosemary, that's for remembrance." But that's no kind of basis for a study. She had after all gone insane after the death of her father and was to kill herself shortly after this scene.


What does rosemary do to your brain?

In scientific terms there are different kinds of memory.

There's past memory - your experiences and what you learned at school. There's present memory, which is your working minute-to-minute memory. And there's future memory or "remembering to remember".

This is for many of us the trickiest one. When it fails bad things happen - we forget to take our vital heart medicine or worse still to buy our spouse's birthday presents. It's the reason letters decompose in my back pocket over months even though I cycle past a postbox every day.

There are plenty of examples of people who have enormously improved their past memories, committing decks of cards to memory or whole new languages. But remembering to remember is more complicated. Like most people I would do almost anything for an improved future memory.

Medicine has little to offer. There are some drugs for treating the memory loss that happens with dementia but they are not hugely effective. They give some measurable benefits but whether they are "clinically significant" is controversial. Certainly they are no miracle cure for people with dementia, nor do they improve the memory of anyone else.

So I was not that hopeful travelling up to Newcastle to see Prof Mark Moss at Northumbria University. His team is running an experiment to test whether rosemary essential oil could benefit future memory. I'll be honest - this seemed hokey.

Rosemary has been linked to memory for hundreds of years. Ophelia in Hamlet says to her brother Laertes: "There's rosemary, that's for remembrance." But that's no kind of basis for a study. She had after all gone insane after the death of her father and was to kill herself shortly after this scene.


What does rosemary do to your brain?

In scientific terms there are different kinds of memory.

There's past memory - your experiences and what you learned at school. There's present memory, which is your working minute-to-minute memory. And there's future memory or "remembering to remember".

This is for many of us the trickiest one. When it fails bad things happen - we forget to take our vital heart medicine or worse still to buy our spouse's birthday presents. It's the reason letters decompose in my back pocket over months even though I cycle past a postbox every day.

There are plenty of examples of people who have enormously improved their past memories, committing decks of cards to memory or whole new languages. But remembering to remember is more complicated. Like most people I would do almost anything for an improved future memory.

Medicine has little to offer. There are some drugs for treating the memory loss that happens with dementia but they are not hugely effective. They give some measurable benefits but whether they are "clinically significant" is controversial. Certainly they are no miracle cure for people with dementia, nor do they improve the memory of anyone else.

So I was not that hopeful travelling up to Newcastle to see Prof Mark Moss at Northumbria University. His team is running an experiment to test whether rosemary essential oil could benefit future memory. I'll be honest - this seemed hokey.

Rosemary has been linked to memory for hundreds of years. Ophelia in Hamlet says to her brother Laertes: "There's rosemary, that's for remembrance." But that's no kind of basis for a study. She had after all gone insane after the death of her father and was to kill herself shortly after this scene.


What does rosemary do to your brain?

In scientific terms there are different kinds of memory.

There's past memory - your experiences and what you learned at school. There's present memory, which is your working minute-to-minute memory. And there's future memory or "remembering to remember".

This is for many of us the trickiest one. When it fails bad things happen - we forget to take our vital heart medicine or worse still to buy our spouse's birthday presents. It's the reason letters decompose in my back pocket over months even though I cycle past a postbox every day.

There are plenty of examples of people who have enormously improved their past memories, committing decks of cards to memory or whole new languages. But remembering to remember is more complicated. Like most people I would do almost anything for an improved future memory.

Medicine has little to offer. There are some drugs for treating the memory loss that happens with dementia but they are not hugely effective. They give some measurable benefits but whether they are "clinically significant" is controversial. Certainly they are no miracle cure for people with dementia, nor do they improve the memory of anyone else.

So I was not that hopeful travelling up to Newcastle to see Prof Mark Moss at Northumbria University. His team is running an experiment to test whether rosemary essential oil could benefit future memory. I'll be honest - this seemed hokey.

Rosemary has been linked to memory for hundreds of years. Ophelia in Hamlet says to her brother Laertes: "There's rosemary, that's for remembrance." But that's no kind of basis for a study. She had after all gone insane after the death of her father and was to kill herself shortly after this scene.


What does rosemary do to your brain?

In scientific terms there are different kinds of memory.

There's past memory - your experiences and what you learned at school. There's present memory, which is your working minute-to-minute memory. And there's future memory or "remembering to remember".

This is for many of us the trickiest one. When it fails bad things happen - we forget to take our vital heart medicine or worse still to buy our spouse's birthday presents. It's the reason letters decompose in my back pocket over months even though I cycle past a postbox every day.

There are plenty of examples of people who have enormously improved their past memories, committing decks of cards to memory or whole new languages. But remembering to remember is more complicated. Like most people I would do almost anything for an improved future memory.

Medicine has little to offer. There are some drugs for treating the memory loss that happens with dementia but they are not hugely effective. They give some measurable benefits but whether they are "clinically significant" is controversial. Certainly they are no miracle cure for people with dementia, nor do they improve the memory of anyone else.

So I was not that hopeful travelling up to Newcastle to see Prof Mark Moss at Northumbria University. His team is running an experiment to test whether rosemary essential oil could benefit future memory. I'll be honest - this seemed hokey.

Rosemary has been linked to memory for hundreds of years. Ophelia in Hamlet says to her brother Laertes: "There's rosemary, that's for remembrance." But that's no kind of basis for a study. She had after all gone insane after the death of her father and was to kill herself shortly after this scene.